Turkish Journal of Anaesthesiology & Reanimation
Resuscitation - ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Conditions in Turkey: Current Status of Code Blue

1.

Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Celal Bayar University Faculty of Medicine, Manisa, Turkey

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Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Dokuz Eylül University Faculty of Medicine, İzmir, Turkey

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Department of Intensive Care, Dokuz Eylül University Faculty of Medicine, İzmir, Turkey

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Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Mersin University Faculty of Medicine, Mersin, Turkey

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Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Başkent University Faculty of Medicine, Adana, Turkey

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Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Ankara Gülhane Training and Research Hospital, Ankara, Turkey

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Department of Anaesthesiology and Intensive Care, Kent Hospital, İzmir, Turkey

Turk J Anaesthesiol Reanim 2021; 49: 30-36
DOI: 10.5152/TJAR.2021.136
Read: 428 Downloads: 230 Published: 02 February 2021

Objective: Globally, previously determined teams activated by ‘code blue’ calls target rapid and organised responses to medical emergency situations. This study aimed to evaluate the cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) conditions in Turkey.

Methods: A web-based survey was sent to anaesthesiologists in Turkey via email. The survey included 36 questions about demographic features and ‘code blue’ practices and procedures.

Results: A total of 180 participants were included. The mean working duration was 16.1±7.5 years. Of the anaesthesiologists who participated, 35% worked in university, 26.1% in education and research, 1.7% in city hospitals, 18.9% in state hospitals and 18.3% in private hospitals; 68.3% had CPR certification. There were code blue systems in 97.6% of the organisations. For code blue calls, 71.9% were activated by calling ‘2222’. There were 41.5% organisations with code blue teams of 3–4 people, whereas 26.7% had 2-member teams. Among call responders, 68.5% were anaesthesia technicians/paramedics, 60.7% were anaesthesiologists and 42.7% were anaesthesia assistants. In organisations, 66.3% regularly conducted code blue training. In total, 63.3% of the participants stated that the time to reach the location was nearly 2–4 minutes. During CPR, the use of capnography was 18.3%. Of the participants, 73.8% chose endotracheal intubation as priority airway device during CPR.

Conclusion: Today, code blue practice is an important quality criterion for hospitals. This study shows the current status of ‘code blue’ according to the results of respondent data completing the survey. To prevent in-hospital cardiac arrest, a chain of preventive measures should be established, including personnel training, monitoring of patients, recognition of patient deterioration, the presence of a call for help system and effective intervention.

Cite this article as: Tezcan Keleş G, Özbilgin Ş, Uğur L, Birbiçer H, Akın Ş, Kuvaki B, et al. Evaluation of Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation Conditions in Turkey: Current Status of Code Blue. Turk J Anaesthesiol Reanim 2021; 49(1): 30-6.

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