Turkish Journal of Anaesthesiology & Reanimation
ORIGINAL ARTICLE

Perioperative Hypothermia after Transurethral Surgeries: Is it Necessary to Heat the Irrigation Fluids?

1.

Department of Anaesthesiology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA

2.

Department of Urology, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, Buffalo, NY, USA

3.

SUNY Upstate Medical University, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, NY, USA

Turk J Anaesthesiol Reanim 2020; 48: 391-398
DOI: 10.5152/TJAR.2019.61214
Read: 63 Downloads: 26 Published: 14 January 2020

Objective: To investigate the role of heated irrigation fluids in the risk of hypothermia and related complications in patients undergoing transurethral procedures.

 

Methods: The medical records of all patients who underwent transurethral procedures between 2000 and 2016 at the VA Hospital were reviewed. Irrigation fluids have been heated to 42°C since 2013, as per the institutional policy (Group II). Prior to this date, room temperature solutions were used (Group I). The perioperative body temperature, use of warming devices, procedure length, and anaesthesia type were extracted from records and compared for both groups. In addition, demographic and anthropometric data, preoperative comorbidities, laboratory data, admission information and postoperative complications were obtained from the quality improvement database.
 

Results: There were 1,363 patients in Group I and 269 patients in Group II. Perioperative temperature was decreased by 0.10°C in Group I compared to a temperature gain of 0.32°C in Group II (p<0.001). Three hundred and forty-eight (21%) patients undergoing transurethral procedures developed hypothermia <36°C. There was no difference in the incidence of postoperative mortality or complications between the normothermic and hypothermic patients.

 

Conclusion: The replacement of room temperature solutions with warmed solutions for irrigation during transurethral procedures reduced the risk of temperature loss and hypothermia following these procedures. Available heating strategies effectively prevented the perioperative heat loss; however, such strategies did not affect the incidence of postoperative complications.

 

Cite this article as: Koleini E, Cohen JS, Darwish OM, Pourafkari L, Rein L, Nader ND. Perioperative Hypothermia after Transurethral Surgeries: Is it Necessary to Heat the Irrigation Fluids? Turk J Anaesthesiol Reanim 2020; 48(5): 391-8.

Files
EISSN 2667-6370